The Hidden Almanac

The Hidden Almanac

Interesting "Facts" every M-W-F

The Hidden Almanac for 2013-12-09

Today is the birthday of ornithologist Hannah Maier. It is also the anniversary of yet another Hateful Decree, and the day it rained fish in Echo Harbor. It is the Feast Day of St. Olio, and in the garden seed catalogs have begun arriving.

Be Safe, and Stay Out of Trouble.

6 Responses to The Hidden Almanac for 2013-12-09

  1. Um … I wasn’t aware that there was such a thing as an “alamanc”. Or is that a typo?

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    • Ah, interns. We have corrected the issue.

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  2. Just noticed there are two different dating conventions in this one episode, there’s the numbered year for the Hateful Decree, and the fish were in the year of the dying bees. How DOES one reconcile these?

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  3. Echo Harbor keeps its own dating conventions, separate from those of the city. Inquiries into it result in a great many missing graduate students, but those that have survived to report back say that citizens are concerned that if the new year followed the old in predictable fashion, “the things will know where to find it.”

    This is probably nonsense, but as Echo Harbor seems to have missed out on what would, in our calendar, be 1681, 1699, 1840, and 1963, one must exercise caution.

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  4. Humm, Echo Harbor seems to have an interesting seed catalog.

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  5. Hagiologists have long disputed the significance of the capybaras in relation to St. Olio.

    Vestigius claims that the saint, abandoned as an infant, had been raised by capybaras before his discovery by a tribe of nomadic hairstylists.

    Wydlyppe of Hamn asserts that they symbolize a miracle performed by Olio before the Troizantine Court, but refuses to specify what exactly the saint did with the capybaras.

    The most recent, and perhaps most controversial, interpretation has been made by Dr. Lumis McAvity of the Former Imperial Seminary. He believes that Olio was originally the pagan god Shmeygh the Shorn, who sacrificed his luxuriant beard, which turned into flax for humans to weave. It is significant that ancient depictions of Shmeygh often show him flanked by mounds of hair, which may have been misinterpreted as capybaras by early illuminators‚Ķ [email protected]=Q

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